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Does Private Farming Help Endangered Animals?

One of the major reasons why most of our precious animal species are getting extinct is poaching. Even though there have been laws making the practice illegal, the poachers continue perpetuating their selfish aims not knowing what kind of disservice they are doing to the biosphere. However, some people practice private farming as a way of protecting these endangered animal species. Does it help endangered animals in the actual sense and is it practical? The answer is yes. Unlike poaching, profit-oriented farming that has been legalized causes an increase in the number of the endangered species.

A good example is the increase of black as well as white rhinoceros in the southern hemisphere whose population has grown due to private farming. Dr. Richard Emslie who is a scientist at IUCN attests to the fact that private farming has been of great help in safeguarding these animal species due to effective enforcement of the law making it easier for local communities to participate fully in conservation programs. It is also a way of helping the government safeguard these animals keeping in mind that the government has a lot on its back.

With substantial economic incentives to private endangered animal farmers such as rewarding those taking care of rhinos, it is likely that poaching activities will go down. The private farmers only need to be assured of the economic gains that they will accrue from private animal farming and they will take up the role to protect endangered animal species.

Private farming of turtles in China has also seen an increase in the number of the specie, though conservation experts argue that the farming has a negative impact on wild turtles as it reduces their population. In this modern era where most governments are concentrating on safeguarding the interests of the increasing population, private farming is the only solution to safeguarding endangered animal species.


Source by John Thorne


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